Datenschutzeinstellungen

Wir nutzen Cookies auf unserer Website. Einige von ihnen sind essenziell, während andere uns helfen, diese Website und Ihre Erfahrung zu verbessern.
In dieser Übersicht können Sie einzelne Cookies einer Kategorie oder ganze Kategorien an- und abwählen. Außerdem erhalten Sie weitere Informationen zu den verfügbaren Cookies.
Group Analyse
Name Google Tag Manager
Technical name gtm_TGBDV4S
Provider Google LLC
Expire in days 360
Privacy policy
Use Tracking
Allowed
Group Essenziell
Name Contao CSRF Token
Technical name csrf_contao_csrf_token
Provider
Expire in days 0
Privacy policy
Use Dient zum Schutz der Website vor Fälschungen von standortübergreifenden Anfragen. Nach dem Schließen des Browsers wird das Cookie wieder gelöscht
Allowed
Group Essenziell
Name Contao HTTPS CSRF Token
Technical name csrf_https-contao_csrf_token
Provider
Expire in days 0
Privacy policy
Use Dient zum Schutz der verschlüsselten Website (HTTPS) vor Fälschungen von standortübergreifenden Anfragen. Nach dem Schließen des Browsers wird das Cookie wieder gelöscht
Allowed
Group Essenziell
Name PHP SESSION ID
Technical name PHPSESSID
Provider
Expire in days 0
Privacy policy
Use Cookie von PHP (Programmiersprache), PHP Daten-Identifikator. Enthält nur einen Verweis auf die aktuelle Sitzung. Im Browser des Nutzers werden keine Informationen gespeichert und dieses Cookie kann nur von der aktuellen Website genutzt werden. Dieses Cookie wird vor allem in Formularen benutzt, um die Benutzerfreundlichkeit zu erhöhen. In Formulare eingegebene Daten werden z. B. kurzzeitig gespeichert, wenn ein Eingabefehler durch den Nutzer vorliegt und dieser eine Fehlermeldung erhält. Ansonsten müssten alle Daten erneut eingegeben werden.
Allowed
Group Essenziell
Name FE USER AUTH
Technical name FE_USER_AUTH
Provider
Expire in days 0
Privacy policy
Use Speichert Informationen eines Besuchers, sobald er sich im Frontend einloggt.
Allowed
Logo Wordinc

4 reasons Chinese is easier to learn than you think

4 reasons Chinese is easier to learn than you think

You’ve probably heard that it is easier to swim to China than it is to learn Chinese. A tonal language? With no alphabet?? And mutually unintelligible dialects??? Relax. What seem like enormous obstacles are actually simple to overcome with a bit of practice.

As the Chinese New Year kicks off this Friday on February 12 – ushering in the year of the ox – we’re taking the occasion to dive into the myths and misconceptions about how difficult it is to learn Chinese.

(And before you send us angry comments about how Chinese isn’t a language and that we should be writing specifically about Mandarin, Min, Wu, Gan, Yue (to which Cantonese belongs), and the other dialects, let us be clear: we use the term “Chinese” to refer to the group of language varieties that share the common Chinese writing system.)

First, you can still make yourself understood without mastering the tones. Mandarin – far and away the most popular variant, with nearly a billion native speakers – has four main tones and one neutral tone that determine whether the single syllable “ma” means mother, horse, marijuana, or “to scold”. But the good news is that most words are made up of two syllables or more, so as long as you put the right two syllables together, people will understand what you mean. Context helps, too, as no one expects the subject of a conversation to suddenly switch from riding horses to smoking reefer. Plus, the position of the word in the sentence will clarify whether it’s a noun or verb.

Which brings us to point two: Chinese grammar is delightfully simple. While people learning English might struggle with correct use of “go,” “going,” “gone,” and “went” (not to mention "would have gone" or the dreadful "will have been going"), Chinese sticks with one word – qù – and adds a word like “tomorrow” or “yesterday” for clarification. We cannot emphasize enough how much easier this makes learning the language. If you’re sick of having to memorize wall-size charts of verb conjugations, and if terms like “subjunctive” and “first conditional” make your brain hurt, it’s time to try learning Chinese. But Chinese goes even further in sweeping up grammatical messes: it has done away with gender (goodbye “der-die-das”), plural (octopus octopus = octopuses? Or octopi?), and articles (a, an, the, etc.).

The writing system, too, is not quite as frightening as you think. About five percent of Chinese characters are pictographic, meaning they look like the thing or idea they represent. For example, counting to three is as simple as 一 二 三 (yī', èr, sān, respectively)*. The character for “mountain” (shan) looks like a miniature mountain range: 山. And when you look at 木 (mù), don’t you see the trunk, branches, and rising peak of a tree?

Finally, you are already more familiar with Chinese vocabulary than you realize. Besides the obvious menu items such as “tofu,” “lo mein” and “oolong,” the word “tea” itself comes from Chinese. “Ketchup” does, too, though the original condiment was a mix of pickled fish and spices, and “typhoon” is the Chinese word meaning “big wind.”

See? We told you it’s not so scary. Maybe now you even want to try learning it. In the meantime, if you have anything to translate into any of its 300 dialects, email us or book an in-person meeting or phone call online. We hope to hear from you soon, and until then, happy Chinese New Year!

***

*To the best of our knowledge, the characters used in the article are from the simplified writing system rather than the traditional one.

Sources:

https://www.hackingchinese.com/learning-chinese-is-easy/

https://blog.hutong-school.com/why-learning-chinese-is-not-as-hard-as-you-think/

 

Go back

Contact

Hamburg
 +49 40 300 30 59-50
  +49 40 300 30 59-58
 

Follow us

Facebook Instagram linkedIn xing

Quotation

Request a non-binding quotation today and we’ll get back to you as quickly as possible!

To your quotation